010 – Firkin, Feurkin, Chicken

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This week we’re talking Fargo Beer Company Summer Wheat, firkin kegs, Chopped Grill Masters, and cooking whole chickens.

What’s Grillin’ Podcast 010 “Firkin, Feurkin, Chicken” Show Notes:

The guys aren’t sure if they qualify for “dozens” of listeners yet.

Welcome special guest John Lamb! We kidnapped him during some pre-show drinks at the Hotel Donaldson.

Instead of being interested in the plethora of good-looking women at the bar, the guys seemed pre-occupied by the fresh produce supplied to the bar by a local CSA.

Fargo Beer Company‘s Summer Wheat is what the guys are drinking. The day the show is recording is actually the first day Fargo Beer Company beer is available in bottles.

There’s debate around the Summer Wheat name.

The guys get there hands on a Bell’s Two Hearted firkin keg, or as Joe would call it, a feurkin.

Coors is deemed the banquet of beers, because if anyone knows what banquet food tastes like that’s how you would describe Coors.

Joe and Charpie both happen to make jerk chicken or “island chicken” (basically translating Island Pork to chicken) over the weekend. The results were successful!

Chopped Grill Masters – and so begins a new show for the guys to poke fun at.

  • Charpie doesn’t understand why grilling shows have to be set in the old west.
  • Joe’s not a fan of the kale pesto.
  • Why the hell is a guy on Chopped that’s never cooked fish before.
  • Joe and Charpie are offended that it appears the grilling theme of Chopped has lowered the standards of the talent required on the show.
  • Joe thinks the winner was clearly out cooked.
  • Charpie is convinced there’s a conspiracy due to the fact that Dr. BBQ won the first round.
  • Dr. BBQ’s superpower would probably be that he explains there’s a difference between BBQ and grilling.

What’s Grillin’

Whole chickens are what’s grillin’ this week.

Charpie’s favorite methods for whole chickens are rotisserie and spatchcocking.

Joe and Charpie both prefer the smaller, free range, organic chickens.

Spatchcocking involves removing the backbone from a chicken and laying it flat. Sometimes, bricks or a cast iron pan may be used to rest on top of the chicken and press the flesh down onto the grate.

Joe and Charpie both don’t think that beer can chicken isn’t a way to infuse flavor into a chicken, but rather just moisture.

Charpie prefers simply roasting a chicken over a roasting pan.

Joe believes that using a rotisserie is the best way to grill a whole chicken. Charpie agrees.

Joe prefers brining the chicken first, then using a rotisserie over charcoal heat and soaked wood chunks.

Propane heat from a gas grill gives off one pound of water for every pound of propane fuel. So, the heat is actually a moist heat compared to the dry heat of charcoal. Charpie recommends adding a pan of water if you’re cooking chicken over charcoal.

Quick Tips

Charpie: Pull your chicken off the grill at 158° fahrenheit (at the thickest part of the thigh) so the chicken reaches the recommended 165° while resting. Always consider the resting period. Don’t overcook your chicken!

Joe: Rub your chicken down with salt a few hours before-hand. Use so much salt that it feels a little bit weird. Before cooking your chicken, rinse the salt off, pat the bird dry, and add your seasoning. The salt will keep the skin tight, helping you maintain a moist bird.

Shout Outs

We get a shout out on Twitter from Myron Mixon, @Lord_of_Q, “Yes. When fruit wood is green you get the benefits of the sugar sap in the wood. Fruit wood only not hardwoods.” in response to @grillingaddicts, “you use green peach wood for smoking?”

“Todd” calls in to talk about green treated wood. Joe recommends not using green treated wood for adding flavor.

Shout out to our new followers on Twitter!

@hofaciest (Miles Ho)

@MDClay12 (mc)

@52hq (Brigid and Craig)

@Hollis333 (Hollis the Third)

@HermanDuncan (Herman)

@KatharineRoss3 (Katharine Ross)


@ArtsPulse (ArtsPulse)

@wfstu20 (Ben Roehl)

@TheAmateurGrill (The Amateur Grill)

 

 

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